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CENTER FOR URBAN BREASTFEEDING

CENTER FOR URBAN BREASTFEEDING

CFUBF2_Events

SOCIAL MEDIA BLITZ

AUG 13-17

Catch us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as we provide stories, data, helpful tips and debunk myths about breastfeeding. We’ll also highlight a few local moms and dads who will share from their personal experiences. All activities are free and open to the public.

Facebook: @HealthyStartPGH

Twitter: @HealthyStartPgh

Instagram: @Healthystart_pgh

BENEFITS OF BREASTFEEDING

Breastfeeding has a number of health benefits for you and your child. Not only does breastfeeding help strengthen bonding, but breastmilk also offers your baby with the unique balance of nutrients their body needs for healthy development.

Studies have shown that exclusive breastfeeding helps to support baby’s healthy growth, lowers their risk of obesity and other health problems, and helps strengthen baby’s immune system. Most importantly, breastfeeding helps to reduce baby’s risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.) You can reap the benefits of breastfeeding too, with lowered risk of type 2 diabetes, and certain types of breast and ovarian cancers.

OUR NEED

IDEAL FOOD FOR HEALTHY GROWTH

According to the World Health Organization, “Breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants; it is also an integral part of the reproductive process with important implications for the health of mothers. Review of evidence has shown that, on a population basis, exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is the optimal way of feeding infants.”

Additionally, the American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms its recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant. The Healthy People 2020 target for the proportion of babies who are ever breastfed is 81.9 percent; however, according to the Centers for Disease Control “Black infants consistently had the lowest rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration across all study years. Black mothers may need more, targeted support to start and continue breastfeeding.”

In Allegheny County in 2012, the health department reported about 55 percent of new black mothers initiated breastfeeding, while 74 percent of their white counterparts did. Additionally, in Allegheny County, women of color who are more likely to deliver low birthweight and preterm babies, and are three times more likely than white women to have their baby succumb to a preventable death within the first year of life. Furthermore, in-hospital lactation supports are inadequate. There is a lot of work to do!

Our Response

EVERY CHILD DESERVES A HEALTHY START. GIVE TODAY